prostheticknowledge:

DevArt

Upcoming exhibition at the Barbican, London, on the art of creative coding. Sponsored by Google, there is also a call for entries for any creative coders who wish to have a piece comissioned. Video embedded below:

DevArt is a new type of art. It is made with code, by developers that push the possibilities of creativity and technology. They use technology as the canvas and code as the raw materials to create innovative, engaging digital art installations.

DevArt is the opportunity to open their creative process, share their art with the world and be a part of a new movement in art.

Google, with the Barbican in London, will commission a developer to create a new digital art installation alongside some of the world’s best interactive artists at the Digital Revolution exhibition: the biggest and most comprehensive exploration of digital creativity ever to be staged in the UK. From there, the exhibition will then go on tour to cities around the world.
Can’t wait to visit the show, which opens in July … you can find out more at the DevArt website here

(via brianlucid)

brianlucid:

Free Lecture:Marek Kultys: Visualization as a Method of Change.October 10, T201. Massachusetts College of Art
Can we augment the concept of visualization? Could visualisation be used not only to show information about the present world, but also to ask questions about the world in the future? Can we intentionally design futures having visualization as a method? This lecture and seminar attempts to fuse both information design and speculative design practices. We will attempt to use visualization in not only a descriptive but also an exploratory and a creative manner.
Marek Kultys is a London-based designer and researcher specializing in visualization of scientific information. He speaks and exhibits his work internationally. Marek holds an MA in Communication Design from Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in London. 
The lecture and seminar will take place on Thursday, October 10th in T201, with optional critique for workshop attendees on Friday, October 11th.
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brianlucid:

Free Lecture:
Marek Kultys: Visualization as a Method of Change.
October 10, T201. Massachusetts College of Art

Can we augment the concept of visualization? Could visualisation be used not only to show information about the present world, but also to ask questions about the world in the future? Can we intentionally design futures having visualization as a method? This lecture and seminar attempts to fuse both information design and speculative design practices. We will attempt to use visualization in not only a descriptive but also an exploratory and a creative manner.

Marek Kultys is a London-based designer and researcher specializing in visualization of scientific information. He speaks and exhibits his work internationally. Marek holds an MA in Communication Design from Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in London. 

The lecture and seminar will take place on Thursday, October 10th in T201, with optional critique for workshop attendees on Friday, October 11th.

(via barelyconcealednuance)

A New Formula for Quantitative UX Decision Making

Imagine a formula that would allow you to take data from a very small pool of users (often as few as 8; possibly as few as 3) and figure out why, for instance, Autodesk customers are calling support, whether Budget.com visitors can rent a car in under a minute, or why cardholders were reluctant to use a mobile payment site.

Such a formula exists, and it’s not some abstract “formula for success” in management strategy or adesign technique. We’re talking about a mathematical formula that’s easy to use but can transform the way you measure and manage the user experience.

The formula is called the Adjusted-Wald Binomial Confidence Interval (“Adjusted-Wald Interval” for short), but its name isn’t as important as what it can do. Its power is in helping estimate the behavior of an entire user population, even when the sample size is small. It does this by taking a simple proportion as input and producing a confidence interval. For example, suppose 10 users have attempted a task and 7 completed it successfully. The simple successful completion rate is 70%. But, given such a small sample size, how can you have any faith in the result? Would it be reasonable to expect to get exactly 7,000 successes if the sample size was 10,000? Probably not, but how far off might it be?

.: Jesse James Garrett: The Elements of User Experience

datalogblog:

“On the web, user experience becomes even more important than it is for other kinds of products” (p.11)

“a website is a “self-service” product. There is no instruction manual to read before hand…There is only the user, facing the site alone with only her wits and experience to guide her.”(p.11)

“user experience is not about how the product works on the inside…User experience is about how it works on the outside, where a person comes into contact with it and has to work with it” (p.10)

Sliced: 13 Tenets of User Experience

rhjr:

A list of 13 beliefs on the value of user experience strategy, design, and designers:

  1. User experience is the net sum of every interaction a person has with a company, be it marketing collateral, a customer service call, or the product or service itself. It is affected by the company’s vision and…
joshbyard:

A Reality-Based Look at the City of the (Near) Future

By 2050, seven out of every ten people on Earth will live in cities. Compared to the beginning of the 20th century, when just 20 percent lived in urban settings, the increase is staggering.
This rapid urbanization coupled with the population explosion that will see 8.9 billion people living on the planet in 2050 presents the challenge of more total humans and a higher percentage of them flocking to cities to find a better life. So, what is the city of the future and what is the future of cities?
Txchnologist asked a few leading thinkers to give their impression of what future cities in 50-100 years will be like.

(via Bye Bye, Jetsons: Engineers and Consultants Offer A Reality-Based Future | Txchnologist)
(ht futurist.com, ht The Futures Agency)
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joshbyard:

A Reality-Based Look at the City of the (Near) Future

By 2050, seven out of every ten people on Earth will live in cities. Compared to the beginning of the 20th century, when just 20 percent lived in urban settings, the increase is staggering.

This rapid urbanization coupled with the population explosion that will see 8.9 billion people living on the planet in 2050 presents the challenge of more total humans and a higher percentage of them flocking to cities to find a better life. So, what is the city of the future and what is the future of cities?

Txchnologist asked a few leading thinkers to give their impression of what future cities in 50-100 years will be like.

(via Bye Bye, Jetsons: Engineers and Consultants Offer A Reality-Based Future | Txchnologist)

(ht futurist.com, ht The Futures Agency)

(via georgevaldes)